TRP ML930 mechanical lever 5 months review

The lever body has visible flex while braking, But I can’t notice it while braking.

TRP offers a carbon version of this lever, which is ML940.

https://trpbrakes.com/category.php?productid=1016&catid=184

Pros

  • better ergonomics than Spyke lever, it got a rounder profile, not as great as Shimano’s shape.
  • Excellent barrel adjuster, it fits well into my fingers and makes it very easy to adjust the wire tension.
  • Lighter than the ML800 Spyke levers
  • Hinged mount for easy removal
  • Rech adjustment so these levers will work well for a kids bike.
  • I have these levers on both of my fuel ex 29ers, and they the levers on both survived crashes, on one it survived over the bar crash, where the bike landed parked upsidedownThe brake on the other bike like it survived a fall about 1 meter from a concrete wall.

Cons

  • Flex in the lever body when braking hard, Which also is present in the Spyke levers.
  • I could never get the reach adjustment bolt to fit securely for long, after some days the bolt would come loose, although I used Loctite 243 I think this is due to the flex in the lever body when braking hard, So I had to add Loctite often.
  • When the levers were new they were a significant amount of up & down play in the lever, which also is present in the Spyke levers, which increased over time. The metal bushings had some wear too, on the top and on the inside, which also contributed to the increased play, but there was significant play from the beginning, due to the bad tolerances, there was a small gap between the bushings and the lever body. The video below shows lever play after 5 months of use, but it was pretty much the same from the beginning.If you ride hard and the brake lever is pressed slightly at an angle due to the play it feels rough. All could easily be avoided if TRP had made it to a tighter tolerance, and used bearings or bushings, for the lever puller.But I have not found another mechanical brake lever that has these features.

 

 

 

 

 

  • the use of rivet for wire puller was a bad choice, it causes fast wear, and more play, than when they were new, and it already had a lot of play, In my opinion, bearings  or bushings would be a better solution. after some weeks of use the lever made some noises, due to the wear, I had to lube the moving parts, it kept getting worse, I continued to lube it regularly.

 

 

 

 

 

 


TRP ML 930 levers fitted on a 800mm Race Face Sixc handlebar, I have them setup 3cm from the grips.

A closer look at the components the Lever is put together with:

The return spring
Lever blade with all parts installed as it would be in the lever body. I managed to do some minor damage to the bolt, in a crash.
Clearly visible damage caused by play in the wire puller, there was significantly more play, in after few months of use, it was a bad choice to use rivets for the wire puller.

whole lever blade assembly: DU FLANGE bushings o lever, return spring, bolt & axle.

Weight vs more reliable reach adjustment. 

 

 

 

 I can’t call the M930 an upgrade or better than the  Spyke levers, the Spyke levers have the reach adjustment on the inside of the lever blade so the flex in the lever body won’t affect the adjustment, it’s also easier to reach, and adjust with a allen key.

I knew this could could be an issue on M930 levers , but I later found the Spyke levers, on chainreactioncycles.

 

Marzocchi Remote  & TRP Spyke lever_0289

 

Verdict:

this is not a perfect mechanical brake lever, neither is the Spyke, but due to the more reliable reach adjustment, I will use the Spyke lever instead.

But it’s not perfect, it has flaws, the rivets in the lever pullers for example.

A mix of these two levers, with the best elements, plus bearing would make a pretty good lever, but nothing like that exist yet to my knowledge.

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quick test ride on 26inch Alprace Sasquatch 2.6 (coop department store bike)

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the bike felt quite heavy when riding it, heavier steering than my fuel ex 7 29er, As the tyres are bigger & wider the wheels are heavier.

the steering was quite decent,  there was no strange steering like on the Diamant 24inch, the bike did go where I wanted it to, when I wanted it to.

the Tektro brakes felt easy to press, and control, similar to Shimano’s, but a bit different, with good modulation, and braking power.
The frame did not have too much flex.

I did not have enough time to properly test ride this bike as the owner had to ride away.

Verdict:

I can’t recommend cheap bikes like these, the components are not great, no clutch on the Shimano Rear derailleur, square taper bottom bracket.

I have still not tested a fat bike in my size.

TIMBER BOLT-ON MODEL long term review

Timber Bell & Ethirteen Dropper post remove 17J V10SS

I wanted a bell like this for many years, finally, I have it.

The body is made of plastic was concerning to me, but so far I have not hit the bell in a crash, I knew it was not as exposed.

Race Face 1x Dropper post remote_2961

I have used this bell for many months, and I have not had any signs of wear yet If I do I will update you on this.

Timberbell Race & Face Turbine_0614
it can be mounted to the thick part of a 31.8 handlebar.

Pros:

  • easy to switch from on & off.
  • Comes with a spacer to mount on the narrower part of the bars
  • No need to ring a bell, this makes a huge difference so there will be less finger fatigue & more control & safer riding.

Cons:

  • There was one flaw I noticed quickly, the ringer gets stuck and does not drop down before significant vibrations occur, which I easily fixed with slamming the front wheel, which you can see in the video below, no more the feeling of almost crashing due to use of bell, this bell lets you shred hard and fast in full control, and when you don’t need it you can switch it off.
  • No 35mm option, so the only place I could mount it was next to the dropper post.

Verdict: Recommended

So far this is the only bell you should get.

every rider needs a bell like this, it makes life so much easier on the trails, you can still shred downhill, and let the hikers know you are coming.

Some use cowbells but they can’t be switched off.

https://www.mtbbell.com/store/p26/TIMBER_Bolt-On_Model_.html

For Norwegian customers: https://www.birk.no/timber-mountain-bike-bell

Flickr Photo Album: https://flic.kr/p/2emjhaA

2014 Diamant Mammut F24 bike test ride – very heavy kids bike

 

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The bike does not come with these grips or this saddle.
Although this bike was too small for me, my points are still valid, I have ridden other 24inch bikes, it’s not the size that makes this bike handle so horrible.This bike is anything but playful, the bike is so heavy its almost glued to the ground, It was impossible for me to do a wheelie or do even a short manual, even jumping was hard, because the weight kept the bike down.

 

 

The brakes lack power, due to only one piston.

but bunny hops are of course more difficult on a smaller bike, but it still felt way too heavy.

Riding up stair steps, in the skatepark, worked without any issues.

The drivetrain is a joke, it’s outdated and

Horrible steering:

when I turned to left it wanted to stay left and this was with the tyres pumped hard.

the fork has a big offset, and the head tube is slack, It’s overkill.

The bike is way too heavy, I am strong, and I could not get the front wheel to stay up, it was just slamming down hard, bunny hopping was quite hard, due to the weight.

 

Many of the Diamant bikes are rebranded bikes from other bike brands, Rockmachine is one of them, But I do not know if this one is rebranded or not.

Verdict

I can’t recommend such heavy bike, even for an adult it’s way too heavy.

https://www.intersport.no/produkt/148801/diamant-mammut-24-fatbike-junior

https://www.bikeexchange.com.au/a/24-kids-bikes/diamant/mammut-f24-junior-24-fat-bike/102633753

Australian distributor: http://www.fatbike.com.au/